Syllabus::

PHS 594/PHY 494: Modeling Instruction in Mechanical Waves & Sound

Summers at Arizona State University (Update Feb. 2013) ASU (updated March 11, 2013)

 

Catalog description: PHS 533/PHY 433: Modeling Instruction in Mechanical Waves and Sound (3 credits) Teaching mechanical waves and sound in high school physics using model-based methods and science practices. Prerequisite: a 3-week PHS 530/PHY480mechanics Modeling Workshop

 

Overview: The course begins with a review of basic features of Modeling Instruction in physics. Teachers are then given a manual of sample course materials and work through them.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

A. Objectives:.

            The main objective of the 1st summer Modeling Workshop (in mechanics) was to acquaint teachers with all aspects of the modeling method of instruction and develop some skill in implementing it. To that end, teachers were provided with a fairly complete set of written curriculum materials to support instruction organized into coherent modeling cycles (as described in Wells et al., A Modeling Method for High School Physics, 1995). The physical materials and experiments in the curriculum are simple and quite standard, already available in any reasonably equipped physics classroom.

              In this course, teachers will review core modeling principles, discuss ways to successfully

implement a modeling approach, then work through coherent model-centered materials in mechanical waves and sound, to develop a deep understanding of content and how to teach it effectively. To these ends, they read, discuss, and reflect on related physics education research articles. The focus is on first-year physics courses that incorporate use algebra and trigonometry.

 

B. Course plan and rationale: The course begins with a review of basic features of Modeling Instruction in physics. Teachers are then given a manual of sample course materials and work through them.

            On the first day, teachers will review and discuss experiences of those participants who have taught mechanics by the modeling method. This "post-use analysis" has two purposes: (1) to make experienced teachers explicitly aware of their own teaching practice and how it compares with the modeling method; (2) to help those who have recently completed PHS 530 get a sense of the rewards and difficulties of teaching via this method. The model-centered approach is contrasted to the standard topic-centered approach. There is less emphasis on why we believe that modeling is superior to conventional instruction, since we assume that teachers coming back to take a follow-up course have come to accept this as true.

            To develop familiarity with the materials necessary to fully implement them in the classroom, we find that teachers must work through the activities, discussions and worksheets, alternating between student and teacher modes, much as they did in the 1st Modeling Workshop in Mechanics. This constitutes the rest of the course. Each Unit in the course manual includes an extensive Teacher Notes section. Throughout the course, teachers are asked to reflect on their practice and how they might apply the techniques they learn in the course to their own classes.

 

C. Description of each unit in the Modeling Workshop in Mechanical Waves & Soundcourse:

      Unit 1: The oOscillating pParticle. In this unit we develop the model of an oscillating particle, its causal force model, the restoring force, along with its kinematical model, simple harmonic motion. We will develop graphical and mathematical representations by experimentally studying the motion of masses oscillating vertically on springs. Energy considerations are also studied.

      Unit 2: Mechanical Waves waves in one d1-Dimension. We connect a string of particles together with springs to help develop the model of a wave being a disturbance propagated through the connected particles as they oscillate. We move on to study the behavior of transverse and longitudinal pulses as they move and reflect. After establishing pulse behavior we use standing waves on a string to experimentally develop the wave velocity equation relating frequency and wavelength. We finish by experimentally developing the relationship of the velocity of waves on a string and the linear density of the string along with the relationship of the velocity and the tension in the string.

      Unit 3: Sound. The model of sound being a pressure wave caused by longitudinally oscillating particles is developed. We study the concept of resonance and factors necessary for it in tubes, on strings and on rods. We use MBL microphones to study beats, harmonics, pitch and loudness. We finish the unit with the Doppler effect.

      Unit 4: Mechanical wWaves in two2 d-Dimensions. We study reflection, refraction, diffraction and two-slit interference. This unit makes uses of ripple tanks to develop two dimensional behaviors. To be honest, the oscillating particle model is not taught as a factor in these behaviors. Due to the difficulty of studying these behaviors fully using coupled particles, we will use light.

      In each unit we will use Java applets, practicums, MBL probes, many demonstrations and deployment activities. Participants will leave with a set of singing rods with rosin, and a Chladi plate.

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: At successful course completion, students will have

-       improved their instructional pedagogy by incorporating the modeling cycle, inquiry methods, critical and creative thinking, cooperative learning, and effective use of classroom technology,

-       deepened their understanding of content in mechanical waves and sound (see above),

-       experienced and practiced instructional strategies of model-centered discourse, Socratic questioning/whiteboarding, use of standardized evaluation instruments, coherent content organization,

-       strengthened coordination between mathematics and physics,

-       increased their skill in all eight scientific practices recommended by the National Research Council in A Framework for K-12 Science Education. Models and theories are the purpose and the outcomes of scientific practices. They are the tools for engineering design and problem solving. As such, modeling guides all other practices.

 

LISTING OF ASSIGNMENTS: This course meets for ~90 hours (studio format) in summer, and you are required to do at least 30 hours of work outside of class, including reading, worksheets, lab reports, and writing. Assignments are listed in the course itinerary; their links to student learning outcomes are evident in the itinerary.

 

ASSIGNMENTS, GRADING POLICIES AND PERCENTAGES:

A. Attendance: You are expected to attend all days of this course. If you miss 2 classes (i.e., 12 9 contact hours), your maximum grade will be a B; if 3, you can earn no higher than a C. Please be on time and ready to go! Report any expected absences to the course instructor as soon as possible. ASU credit-seeking students who miss course time are to complete and write a reflection for all activities missed, design an activity modified or developed for pilot use in the classroom this coming year, and present results to the course instructor and peers when appropriate.

 

 


B. Assignments and Ggrading policy:

Students will contract for a letter grade on the second class day. Contracting for a letter grade is not a guaranteed grade. Work must be completed at ASU standards and meet all class requirements.           Within grade categories, additional requirements are assigned for the graduate level course, than for the undergraduate course. All participants, whether seeking ASU credit or not, are expected to do activities and homework, as described below for a C grade. (Non-credit participants should email the instructor, specifying which days they intend to participate, at the start of the course.)

                        To earn a letter grade of C, you are expected to do the following:

      Keep a course notebook in which all labs, activities and demonstrations are placed. Teachers find this notebook to be a valuable resource as they use the curricular materials in their own classes. (50%)

       You will perform labs in student mode. All labs should include the pre-lab, the purpose, your data, all graphs (with curve fits if not linear), equations of linearized graphs, manipulations of units, statement of the relationship and the general equation for the lab. For each lab, add the necessary comments that will help you guide your students through successful lab experiences.

    You should also take notes on demonstrations and the concept they are designed to illustrate.

    Any activities such as practicums that we do should have the question to be solved along with the data and calculations needed to solve it.

         You will perform labs in student mode. Record notes from the pre-lab discussion, record and evaluate data and summarize the findings of the class in your lab notebook. Write down notes that will help you when you have students do the lab. Some teachers benefit by writing down good questions asked during whiteboarding. You should also take notes on demonstrations and the concept they are meant to illustrate. Formally write up labs designated by the instructor. Teachers find this notebook to be a valuable resource as they use the curricular materials in their own classes. (50%)

      Formally write up one of the four paradigm labs at 80% level or higher. (90% minimum for an A). (10%)

      Work out all designated problems and questions on the worksheets and insert them into your 3-ring binder. (1015%)

      Participate actively and thoughtfully in whiteboarding sessions, the discussion of readings, activities, and the worksheets. (10%)

      From time to time, you will be given a reading on a current topic or articles from physics education research. For each of these, write a one half to one-page typed reaction (not a synopsis) in which you offer your views about ideas discussed in the reading assignment. (1010%)

      For each Unit, record your reflections on the activities of your team as you work through the materials, and comment on the storyline. (10%)

 

         For each Unit, record your reflections on the activities of your team as you work through the materials, and comment on the storyline. (15%)

            To be considered for a B, graduate teachers studentsin PHS 533 do all of the above plus two more assignments. One is a two-page (minimum) typed reflection paper describing one of the following; how Modeling Instruction in mechanical waves and sound differs from your current practice and what changes you plan to incorporate, or the issues with which you will have to deal in order to implement materials and strategies from the course in your classroom.. (For PHY 433 students, your paper should discuss instead what you learned from the course, and your understanding of Modeling Instruction in the context of mechanical waves and sound.) In addition a second paradigm lab must be written formally with a grade of 80% or better. (Due on the 3rd-to-last class day.) (Undergraduate students omit the reflection paper but do the formal write-up.)

            To be considered for an A, graduate in PHS 533, youstudents will be required to complete two additional assignments. One choice is a set of assorted problems with more rigor than the typical modeling type problems. Another is to write up one or two of themore paradigm labs you have not written up. They must have a grade of 90% or better.an article review in which you search for educational research on any appropriate topic. Provide a copy of the research and include a one-page synopsis of the article along with a discussion of the articles usefulness to the course. A third choice is to locate a web-based resource applicable to the course along with a discussion on how and where it would be incorporated into a Unit. (Due on the next-to-last class day.) To be considered for an A in PHY 433Undergraduate , you will be required tostudents do one of the additionalse assignments described above. (Due on the next-to-last class day.)

 

 


C. Grading scale:      97-100 A+ 93-96.9 A 90-92.9 A-

                                    87-89.9 B+ 83-86.9 B 80-82.9 B-

                                    77-79.9 C+ 73-76.9 C 70-72.9 C-

 

Policies of Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR), ASU, and Department of Physics:

* ABOR: Each student is expected to work a minimum of 45 hours per semester hour of credit.

* Pass-fail is not an option for graduate courses. https://students.asu.edu/grades-grading-policies

* 3.0 grade point average (GPA) is minimum requirement for MNS & other graduate degrees.

* Incomplete: only for special circumstances. Must finish course within 1 year, or it becomes E.

* An instructor may drop a student for non-attendance during the first two class days (in summer).

* An instructor may withdraw a student with a mark of "W" or a grade of "E" only in cases of disruptive classroom behavior."

* The ASU Department of Physics is critical of giving all A's, because it indicates a lack of discrimination. A grade of "B" (3.0) is an average graduate course grade, and obviously not all students do above-average work compared to their peers. Some of you can expect to earn a "B, and those who are below average but do acceptable work will earn a "C".

D. Arizona Board of Regents and ASU policies:

Each student is expected to spend a minimum of 45 hours per semester hour of credit.

Pass-fail is not an option for graduate courses. https://students.asu.edu/grades-grading-policies

B grade means average; 3.0 GPA is minimum requirement for MNS & other graduate degrees.

Incomplete: only for special circumstances. Must finish course within 1 year, or it becomes E.

An instructor may drop a student for non-attendance during the first two class days (in summer).

An instructor may withdraw a student with a mark of "W" or a grade of "E" only in cases of disruptive classroom behavior."

 

E. Academic dishonesty policy: Academic honesty is expected of all students in all examinations, papers, laboratory work, academic transactions and records. The possible sanctions include, but are not limited to, appropriate grade penalties, course failure (indicated on the transcript as a grade of E), course failure due to academic dishonesty (indicated on the transcript as a grade of XE), loss of registration privileges, disqualification and dismissal.  For more information, see http://provost.asu.edu/academicintegrity.Please refer to http://provost.asu.edu/academicintegrity. Students who suspect a policy violation are encouraged to discuss their concerns with their course instructor. ASU has a grade of "XE" which can become part of a transcript and permanent academic records and explicitly means that the student failed a course because of academic dishonesty.        

 

F. Disability policy: Qualified students with disabilities who require disability accommodations in this course are encouraged to make their requests to the instructor on the first class day or before. Note: Prior to receiving disability accommodations, verification of eligibility from the Disability Resource Center (DRC) is required. Disability information is confidential.

 

 

REQUIRED INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS:

No textbook. 3-ring binder (preferably 1.5 inches thick); 6 tab inserts. You will also need a 9 x 12 quad-ruled lab notebook. This size will allow you to easily tape or paste in data you collect and graphs you produce from the labs you perform during the workshop, as well as your reflections on activities and readings assigned. (Buy at ASU bookstore or Staples for ~$154).

 

 

REQUIRED READING: (Get print copy from instructor if you cannot download for free.)

Michael Wittmann, The Object Coordination Class Applied to Wavepulses: Analyzing Student Reasoning in Wave Physics, International Journal of Science Education 24:1, 97-118 (2002). Preprint at http://arxiv.org/ftp/physics/papers/0207/0207042.pdf

 

Michael C. Wittmann, Richard N. Steinberg, Edward F. Redish, Understanding and Affecting Student Reasoning About Sound Waves. International Journal of Science Education 25:8, (2003). Preprint at http://perlnet.umephy.maine.edu/research/2001wittmannsound.pdf

 

 

RECOMMENDED READING:

Fernand Brunschwig, Teaching Physics: Inquiry and the Ray Model of Light. Get from the author, an expert modeler who was Robert Karplus graduate student: fbrunsch AT gmail.com

Bruce Sherwood, Answer to Question #21, American Journal of Physics 64, 840-842 (1996) Available at http://matterandinteractions.org/Content/Articles/Refraction.pdf

Thomas L. O'Kuma, David Maloney, and Curtis J. Hieggelke, Ranking Task Exercises in Physics. See http://www.compadre.org/psrc/items/detail.cfm?ID=3686

 

RECOMMENDED MEDIA:

Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse: (many resources can be obtained by a web search)

A video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-zczJXSxnw(6 min.)

K-12 teachers guide by AAPT: http://aapt.org/Store/upload/tacoma_narrows2.pdf

Detailed account: http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/tnbhistory/Connections/connections3.htm

Mechanisms for collapse: http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/TNBhistory/Machine/machine3.htm

Mechanical Universe: http://www.learner.org/resources/series42.html - program_descriptions

Lesson 17: Resonance; Lesson 18: Waves (each is 29 minutes; video on demand – free)



Mechanical Itinerary for Mechanical Waves and Sound (20 4.5-hour days: 90 contact hrs)

Day 1

     Introduce leaders and participants.

     Take Wave survey and fill in comfort sheet

     Formulate a list of questions on Modeling teaching you want answered during the course

    Pace, whiteboarding, what worked, what didnt, anything else

     Lay out plan for the course

     Discuss expectations (students and teachers)

     Discuss formal lab reports

     Discuss relationships

     Paradigm lLab: Begin oscillating particle model, perform and analyze spring/mass lab

HW – Relationship Worksheet

Day 2

     Whiteboard relationship worksheet

     Continue with oscillating particle lab

     Finish taking data

     Process data

     Whiteboard Lab

     Worksheet 1 and 1B of Unit 1

     Activity 1, Analysis of force, acceleration, velocity and position for an oscillating particle

     and 3 of Unit 1

     Activity 2, Energy changes for an oscillating particle (modeling horizontal oscillation)

HW – Work on notebook and lab report for Unit 1 paradigm lab

Day 3

     Worksheet 2

     Activity 2b, eEnergy changes for an oscillating particle with GPE

     Worksheet 3

     Predict and investigate relationship of EK and position, EE and position and E and position

HW – Work on notebook and lab report for Unit 1 paradigm lab

Day 4

     Do worksheet 3 and whiteboard

     Activity 3, relationship of period and frequency

     Do worksheet 4 and whiteboard

     Unit 1 practicum

HW – Oscillation worksheet due day 6 (It is in section 5 of your 3-ring, should it be WS 5?)

Day 5

     Unit 1: Activity 4, Extension of OP model to transverse displacement (Show equipment and discuss)

     Do quiz 1 and whiteboard

     Wrap up Uunit 1

     Begin Unit 2: Demonstration of cCoupled oOscillating particles

     Activity 1: Pulses on springs - Wave race

     Worksheet 1 of Unit 2

HW – Read Unit 1 teacher notes and write reflections on Uunit 1


 

Day 6

     Whiteboard WS 5

     Demonstrations – Fixed and free end reflection, waves at a boundary of two media

     Worksheet 2 of Unit 2

     Demonstrations: wave superposition

     Worksheet 3 of Unit 2

     Flipbook

     Develop behavior and reasoning for standing waves

      Paradigm lLab 2: Determine the relationship of the wavelength and the frequency of a wave and the relationship of the frequency and number of antinodes on a string

HW – Read and summarize important points in Causal Particle-Spring model (Due day 8)

**Turn in course notebook with oOscillation lab

Day 7

     Whiteboard lab, make v vs. f graph

     Unit 2 wWorksheet 5

     Paradigm lLab 3: Relationship of velocity of waves on a string and the tension in the string, velocity of waves on a string and the linear density of the string

HW – Work on paradigm lab 2 write-up

Day 8

     Discuss Causal Particle-Spring model reading

     Finish up and whiteboard lab

     Unit 2, worksheet 6

     Unit 2 practicum

    Discuss low tech version of lab

HW – Work on paradigm lab 3 write-up if going for A grade

Day 9

     Begin sound (Unit 3)

    Longitudinal pulses, waves, standing waves

     Speed of sound in air lab and discussion

     Introduce the concept of resonance

    Play with singing rods, Chladni plates

     Worksheet 1 of Unit 3

     Trip to F wing (pPendulum and wine glass demo)

     Longitudinal applet and candle clip

     Mechanical Universe 17, Tacoma Narrows bridge collapse video

HW – Work on lLab wWrite-ups, Read teacher notes for Unit 2 and write reflections on Uunit 2

Day 10

     Mechanical Universe: Waves

     Determine the relationship of the tube length and the resonant frequency

     Demo/dDiscussion: rResonance and standing waves in tubes

     Big open tube demo

     Worksheet 2 of Unit 3

     Lab/pPracticum

HW – Longitudinal reading and reflection


 

Day 11

     Discuss reading

     Sound aActivity (pPitch, beats, harmonics, loudness)

     Deployment activities for beats and other sound phenomena

     Doppler effect demonstrations and derivation of equation

     Unit 3, wWorksheet 3

HW – Take Mechanical Waves diagnostic test

Day 12

     Discuss questions on waves diagnostic test

     Go through applets. Identify on your sheet those useful in your class, report any good applets found

     Check out Rranking Ttasks

     Wave and sSound tests on Units 2 and 3 (Take and discuss)

HW – Reading on sound (Not much to reflect on, just summarize key points)

Day 13

     Reflection in wave tank

     2D representations

     Reflection pin lab and red activity

     Do Unit 4 worksheet 1 and whiteboard

**Turn in notebook and two labs (iIf going contracted for A grade;, otherwise one lab)

HW – Michael Wittmann reading #1 and reflection (Discuss on day 14)

Day 14

     Discuss reading

     Look over problem test

     Introduce refraction

     Laser into aquarium

     Refraction in ripple tank

     Unit 4 worksheet 2 (qualitative refraction)

     Could be paradigm lab: Relationship of incident and refracted semicord.

     Derive Snells lLaw from lab

     Refraction ray tracing

     Critical angle discussion and demos

     Frosted plastic

     Pop bottle

     Do Uunit 4 worksheet 3 (quantitative refraction)

HW – Read teacher notes for Unit 3 and write reflections

Day 15

     Whiteboard worksheet 3

     1 or 2 refraction practicums

     Paradigm lLab 4: Determine the relationship of the image distance minus the focal length and the object distance minus the focal length. Also determine the relationship of the ratio of the image distance to the object distance and the ratio of the image height to the object height.

     Whiteboard lLab and discuss relationships

HW – Michael Wittmann reading #2 and reflection (Day 16 discussion)


 

Day 16

     Discuss reading

     Do Unit 4 worksheet 4 (qualitative lens worksheet)

     Do Unit 4 worksheet 5 (quantitative lens worksheet)

     Do focal length of concave lens (if time)

     Lens practicum

     Wave tTank Activity: dDiffraction

     Wave tTank Activity: iInterference

HW – Work on Lens lab write-up

Day 17

     Waves Unit 4 wWorksheet 6: Interference (Qualitative)

     Develop Youngs eEquation

     Part 1 of iInterference lLab: Calibrate dDiffraction grating

     Part 2 of iInterference lLab: Check spectra of Mercury

     Part 3 of iInterference lLab: Get unknown spectral line

HW – Get course notebook ready to turn in

Day 18

     Waves Unit 4 wWorksheet 7: Interference (Quantitative)

     Interference pPracticum

     Mechanical Universe: Optics

       Unit 4 Conceptual Test

     

**Turn in course notebook. Turn in final reflection if contracted for B or A.

Day 19

     Introduce color

     Unit 4 worksheet 8: Color

     Thin film interference

     Waves Unit 4 wWorksheet 9: tThin film interference

     Whiteboard tThin fFilm iInterference

     Unit 4 Problem Test

HW – Read teacher notes and do reflection on Unit 4

**Turn in paradigm lab 4 or problem set if going contracted for A grade.

Day 20

     Check out Rranking Ttasks CD

     Go through applets. Identify on your sheet those useful in your class. Search for new applets

     Make and take Bicolor LED

    Post-test, course evaluation, final paperwork

    Distribute CDs and discuss contents, how to navigate website

HW – Have a safe trip home

 


Course itinerary (10 8.5 hour days, or 15 6-hour days: ~90 contact hours)

 

Day 1

       Introduce leaders and participants.

       Take Waves pre-test (available from Michael Crofton) and fill in comfort sheet

       Formulate a list of questions on Modeling teaching you want answered during the course

       Pace, whiteboarding, what worked, what didnt, anything else

       Take Mechanics Baseline Test and Experiences (implementation) Survey

       Lay out plan for the course

       Discuss expectations (students and teachers)

       Discuss lab reports

       Discuss relationships

       Paradigm Lab: Begin oscillating particle model, perform and analyze spring/mass lab

       Take data

       Process data

       Whiteboard Lab

HW – Relationship Worksheet

Work on notebook and lab report for Unit 1 paradigm lab

Reading: Hestenes: Who Needs Physics Education Research?! (on ASU modeling website)

 

Day 2

       Whiteboard relationship worksheet

       Do worksheets 1 and 1B of Unit 1 and whiteboard

       Activity 1, Analysis of force, acceleration, velocity and position for oscillating particle

       New worksheet: Quantified kinematics relationships for oscillations

       Activity 2, Energy changes for an oscillating particle (modeling horizontal oscillation)

       Do worksheet 2 and whiteboard

       Activity 2b, Energy changes for an oscillating particle with GPE

       Do worksheet 3 and whiteboard

       Predict and investigate relationship of EK and position, EE and position, E and position

HW – Work on notebook and lab report for Unit 1 paradigm lab

 

Day 3

       Activity 3, relationship of period and frequency

       Do worksheet 4 and whiteboard

       Unit 1 practicum

       Unit 1: Activity 4, Extension of OP model to transverse displacement (Show equipment and discuss)

       Do quiz 1 and whiteboard

       Wrap up unit 1

       Begin Unit 2: Demonstration of Coupled Oscillating particles

       Activity 1: Pulses on springs- Wave race

       Do worksheet 1 of Unit 2 and whiteboard

HW – Read Unit 1 teacher notes and write reflections on unit 1, Take Unit 1 test (2009 vs)

 


 

 

Day 4

       Correct Unit 1 test

       Activity – Fixed and free end reflection, waves at a boundary of two media

       Do worksheet 2 of Unit 2 and whiteboard

       Activity and discussion: wave superposition

       Do worksheet 3 of Unit 2

       Develop behavior and reasoning for standing waves Flipbook

        Paradigm Lab 2: Determine the relationship of the wavelength and the frequency of a wave and the relationship of the frequency and number of antinodes on a string

       Whiteboard lab, make v vs. f graph

       Do worksheet 5 of Unit 2 and whiteboard

       Paradigm Lab 3: Relationship of velocity of waves on a string and the tension in the string, velocity of waves on a string and the linear density of the string

       Finish up and whiteboard lab

       Do worksheet 6 of Unit 2 and whiteboard

HW – Read and summarize important points in Causal Particle-Spring model

       Work on paradigm lab 2 write-up

 

Day 5

       Discuss Causal Particle-Spring model reading

       Discuss low tech version of paradigm labs

       Unit 2 practicum

       Begin sound (Unit 3)

       Longitudinal pulses, waves, standing waves

       Speed of sound in air lab and discussion

       Longitudinal applet and candle clip

       Introduce the concept of resonance

       Play with singing rods, Chladni plates

       Tacoma Narrows video

       Worksheet 1 of Unit 3

       Trip to Physics Dept lobby (Pendulum and wine glass demo)

HW – Read teacher notes for Unit 2 and write reflections on Unit 2, Problem set 1

Turn in one or two formal labs

 

Day 6

        Mechanical Universe: Waves

       Determine the relationship of the tube length and the resonant frequency

       Demo/Discussion: Resonance and standing waves in tubes

       Big open tube demo

       Worksheet 2 of Unit 3

       Lab/Practicum

       Sound Activity (pitch, beats, harmonics, loudness)

       Deployment activities for beats and other sound phenomena

       Doppler effect demonstrations and derivation of equation

       Unit 3, Worksheet 3

HW – Longitudinal reading and reflection

–Take Mechanical Waves diagnostic test

**Turn in notebook


 

 

Day 7

       Discuss questions on diagnostic test

       Wave and Sound tests on Units 2 and 3 (Take conceptual and correct)

       Reflection in wave tank

       2D representations

       Reflection pin lab and red activity

       Do Unit 4 worksheet 1 and whiteboard

       Introduce refraction

       Laser into aquarium

       Refraction in ripple tank

       Unit 4 worksheet 2 (qualitative refraction)

       Could be paradigm lab: Relationship of incident and refracted semicord.

       Derive Snells Law from lab

HW – Reading on sound (Not much to reflect on, just summarize key points)

– Michael Wittmann reading #1 and reflection

 

Day 8

       Refraction ray tracing

       Critical angle discussion and demos

       Frosted plastic

       Pop bottle

       Do unit 4 worksheet 3 (quantitative refraction) Whiteboard worksheet 3

       1 or 2 refraction practicums

       Paradigm Lab 4: Determine the relationship of the image distance minus the focal length and the object distance minus the focal length. Also determine the relationship of the ratio of the image distance to the object distance and the ratio of the image height to the object height.

       Whiteboard Lab and discuss relationships

HW – Read teacher notes for Unit 3 and write reflections

Write up lens lab

If contracted for B grade, turn in 2-page paper

 


 

 

Day 9

       Discuss reading

       Do Unit 4 worksheet 4 (qualitative lens worksheet)

       Do Unit 4 worksheet 5 (quantitative lens worksheet)

       Do focal length of concave lens

       Lens practicum

       Wave Tank Activity: Diffraction

       Wave Tank Activity: Interference Waves Unit 4 Worksheet 6: Interference (qualitative)

       Develop Youngs Equation

       Part 1 of Interference Lab: Calibrate diffraction grating

       Part 2 of Interference Lab: Check spectra of Mercury

       Part 3 of Interference Lab: Get unknown spectral line

HW – Work on problem set

**Turn in notebook

If contracted for A grade, turn in the two A grade assignments

 

Day 10

       Unit 4 Worksheet 7: Interference (quantitative)

       Interference Practicum

       Unit 4 Conceptual Test

       Check out ranking tasks CD

       Go through applets. Identify on your sheet those useful in your class. Search for new applets

       Waves post-test, course evaluation, final paperwork

       Distribute CDs and discuss contents, how to navigate website

HW – Have a safe trip home